Page 32 - December2018
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PHOTO COURTESY OF THE WONDERFUL COMPANY
Super Sales in the Produce Section
How stores can gear up and offer healthier options for the Big Game. BY ANTHONY STOECKERTY
OS T O E C K R T
n Feb. 3, 2019, about 100
million people will gather around their televisions as the National Football League’s two best teams square o  to deter-
mine this season’s champion.
But the real action is taking place in the
produce section.
Super Bowl Sunday (Kicko  is 6:30 p.m.
EST on NBC from Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta) is practically a holiday, and just as important as the game (and the commer- cials) is the food. People don’t simply watch the game — they throw parties and  ll their tables with culinary delights.
According to a 2017 report by ABC News, people eat more than 1 billion wings on Super Bowl Sunday, and they spend $227 million on potato chips, $10 million on deli dips, $89 million on popcorn, and $58 million on deli sandwiches.
 ose aren’t exactly nutritious foods, and indeed dieting takes a back seat on Super Bowl Sunday, but healthy foods are part of the fun, too.  at same report claimed Americans spend $13 million on vegetable trays and used about 104.9 million pounds of
32 / DECEMBER 2018 / PRODUCE BUSINESS
avocados to make guacamole for their Super Bowl spreads.
And that means produce sections need to get ready for some championship sales numbers in the weeks and days leading up to the Big Day.
GETTING READY FOR GAME DAY
 e versatility of fruits and vegetables means there are lots of ways to promote them for the Super Bowl.  ey can be stand-alone
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE WATERMELON PROMOTIION BOARD
snacks, or used in sauces, side dishes and desserts. And their simplicity is a big selling point.
“Whether it’s tailgaters at the game, or watchers at home, consumers want ease when watching the Big Game,” says Jacob Shafer, senior marketing communications specialist for Mann Packing, headquartered in Salinas, CA. “Getting back to watching the game as fast as possible has never mattered more, and one of the biggest reasons for a consumer to be unsatis ed with a product is the amount of e ort they have to put into it. Basically, tailgaters and those watching at home want quick, sometimes-healthy meal solutions that are delicious. We are focusing on continued innovation, striving to bring ultimate conve- nience and freshness to consumers.”
He adds that Mann has teamed up with retailers to expand shelf o erings of in-de- mand, fresh-cut vegetables items.
“Retailers must understand the data and the trends driving the category, especially leading up to the Big Game and take advan- tage of all selling opportunities,” he says.
Camille Balfanz, brand manager for Lite- house, Inc., based in Sandpoint, ID, notes


































































































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